A patient must be diagnosed with at least one of the following qualifying conditions to receive medicinal cannabis or a cannabis delivery device.

AIDS
ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
Alzheimer’s
Anxiety
Arthritis
Back Pain
Cancer
Cerebral Palsy‎
Crohn’s Disease‎
Degenerative Disc Disorder‎
Diabetes‎
Epilepsy
Fibromyalgia
Glaucoma‎
Hepatitis C
Herniated Disk
HIV
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (chronic)
Lupus‎
Lyme Disease
Migraine
Multiple Sclerosis‎
Muscle Spasms‎
Muscular Dystrophy‎
Myasthenia Gravis‎
Myositis‎
Neuropathy‎
Osteroarthritis
Osteoporosis‎
Parkinson’s Disease‎
Peripheral Vascular Disease‎
Polymyalgia Rheumatica‎
Post-Polio Syndrome‎
Psychiatric Conditions‎
PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)
Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy‎
Rheumatoid Arthritis‎
RLS (Restless Legs Syndrome)
Seizures
Severe and Chronic Pain
Sickle Cell Anemia
Scoliosis‎
Spasticity‎
Spinal Stenosis‎
Tourette’s
Ulcerative Colitis
Another Debilitating Condition

 

  • Patients must undergo a physical exam and full assessment of medical history with a qualifying physician.
  • Patient must be a resident of the state of Florida.
  • If a patient is younger than 18 years of age, a second physician must concur with this determination, and such concurrence must be documented in the patient’s medical record.
  • Determine whether the patient is pregnant and document in the patient’s medical record.
  • You must obtain voluntary, written informed consent from the patient or the patient’s legal representative /guardian for treatment with low-THC or Medical Cannabis.

THE ‘RIGHT TO TRY ACT’

Right To Try is federal legislation that allows terminally ill patients to access investigational treatments that have passed basic safety testing (Phase I) with the FDA, but are not yet available on pharmacy shelves.

Over 1 million Americans die from a terminal illness every year. Many spend years searching for a potential cure, or struggle in vain to get accepted into a clinical trial. Unfortunately, FDA red tape and government regulations restrict access to promising new treatments, and for those who do get access, it’s often too late.

Right To Try allows terminally ill Americans to try medicines that have passed Phase 1 of the FDA approval process and remain in clinical trials but are not yet on pharmacy shelves. Right To Try expands access to potentially life-saving treatments years before patients would normally be able to access them.

The Right to Try law was signed into law in June 2015 in Florida. It has been signed into law in 30 other states as well: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming.

FAQ